Get Adobe Flash player

stvpasig.org

13th Sunday C


Lk.9:51-62

Dealing with Mistreatment

On the way they entered a Samaritan village to prepare for his reception there, but they would not welcome him because the destination of hid journey was Jerusalem. When the disciples James and John saw this they asked, ‘Lord do you want us to call down fire from heaven to consume them?’ Jesus turned and rebuked them and they journeyed to another village” (Lk.9:52-56).

Jesus was headed toward Jerusalem and on the way came into a Samaritan village but they did not welcome Him. They were prejudiced against Jesus and felt they were racially superior to Him. When the disciples James and John saw this they reacted and asked, “Lord, do want us to call down fire from heaven to consume them?” James and John were called Boarnerges, which mean sons of thunder, a name which suggests impetuous temper or hotheaded. They can’t let this slight on Jesus pass and they wanted to take action, which to them was a praiseworthy thing to do. They offered to call in divine help to blot out the village. Yet, Jesus turned and rebuked them. Unlike His two disciples, Jesus dealt with the situation patiently and peacefully. How do we deal with people who reject us or treat us shabbily?                            One day while walking in a crowded city, a guy in front of me was smoking while walking. Naturally, I sniffed the smoke and it ticked me off. I ran passed the guy, looked back and hollered at him, “I hope you get a cancer!” then I scram. (The guy was bigger than me, it’s better to run fast).  

  Almost everyday we are put in situations where our patience is challenged and we encounter people who annoy, upset, aggravate, and infuriate us. If we believe in the principle of non-violence perhaps we don’t actually call for a fight but we can’t move past it without at least wishing bad things to happen to them, and mutter, “I hope you drop dead.”  Our temper is so short in such aggravating circumstances. But what’s the right way of responding to it? Like James and John do we need call down fire from heaven to consume them?

The right way to respond to prejudice, slight, rejection, rejection, indifference, and mistreatment is to deal with them the way Jesus did - patiently and peacefully. Jesus is teaching us the duty of tolerance. For some tolerance is a lost of virtue but our tolerance must be based not on indifference but on love. We ought to be tolerant not because we care less but because we look at the person with the eyes of love. When someone wrongs us, it is his or her problem. When we return evil for evil, when we fight back then we too have a problem, for our reaction was intentional. If someone wrongs us we must not regard the person as an enemy to be destroyed but a friend who has strayed and has to be recovered by love.

There was an old Chinese emperor who wanted to conquer the land of his enemies and kill all of them. Sometime later people saw him sitting down, eating and joking with his enemies. “But didn’t you tell us that you wanted to do away with all your enemies?” The emperor said in reply, “That’s right. I did away with them. I made them friends.” 

Abraham Lincoln was criticized for being too courteous to his enemies and reminded that was reminded of his duty to destroy them. His great reply was, “Do I not destroy enemies when I make them my friends?”

Let us learn from Jesus. Let us destroy our enemies not by attacking them nor wishing them bad things but making them our friends.                           

 

Rev. Fr. Clod V. Bagabaldo

12th Sunday

Children of the Promise

Readings:
Zech 12:10-11; 13:1
Ps 62:2-6. 8-9 r. 2
Gal 3:26-29
Luke 9:18-24

In this Sunday’s readings we hear the voice of the Prophet Zechariah as he delivers difficult oracles from God. The people have returned from exile. Now back in Jerusalem, they face the arduous work of rebuilding the Temple. Zechariah acknowledges their hardships and foresees more obstacles.

But their grief has a purpose. It is a remedy, a penance to heal them—“a fountain to purify from sin and uncleanness.”

Thus purified, the people will be ready to receive the Messiah and usher in a new creation. God promises to “pour out on the house of David and on the inhabitants of Jerusalem a spirit of grace and petition.” So that no one should mistake the identity of the Messiah when He comes, God says through Zechariah: “they shall look on him whom they have thrust through, and they shall mourn for him as one mourns for an only son … a first-born.” That prophecy could be fulfilled in no other than Jesus, the Word made Flesh, the Only-Begotten Son of God, the Crucified.

The day of the Messiah indeed came, with an outpouring of the Spirit. Yet it was a saving event not only for Jerusalem, but for all people. Both Jews and Gentiles could become “children of God,” in St. Paul’s stunning phrase. Now, “There is neither Jew nor Greek … slave nor free … male and female …  if you belong to Christ, then you are Abraham’s descendant, heirs according to the promise.”

In light of these readings, Sunday’s Gospel is poignant. Jesus asks his closest friends, ” who do you say that I am?” Peter replies, “The Messiah of God.” Jesus then reveals to them, as Zechariah had foretold, that the Messiah must be “thrust through” and killed and mourned before the Spirit would come forth on Pentecost.

The day has indeed come. Yet still we long for its fullness, and so we pray to God in the Psalm: “for you I long! For you my body yearns; for you my soul thirsts, Like a land parched, lifeless, and without water.”

 

Yours in Christ,

 

Scott Hahn, Ph.D.

Solemn Feast of the Sacred Heart 2013

Sacred Heart of Jesus

  

Today we celebrate the solemnity of the Sacred Heart. The devotion to the Sacred Heart was based on the revelation of St. Margarette Alacoque. Linguistically speaking, the word "Sacred" is synonym to "Divine" and the word "Heart" is synonym of "Love." As such, when reference is made to the Sacred Heart, it is understood to be a reference to the Divine love of God that echoes the Sacred nature of the Lord; "God is love." [1 Jn. 4:8] In the Sacred Heart is revealed the undeserved love of God that was manifested through the atoning sacrifice of Jesus for our sins. [1 Jn. 4:10]. God's love for us was revealed through His Son, our Lord Jesus. "For God so loved the world that He gave His only Son, so that everyone who believes in Him may not perish but may have eternal life." [Jn. 3:16]

God reminds us in today’s readings that he is always close to us in our needs and concerns, ready and willing to come to our aid. Like a good shepherd he watches over us and is saddened when we stray from grace and disregard the suggestions of the Holy Spirit in our conscience. Far from the idea of the ancient philosophers who imagined the deity as an immovable mover, a distant and removed reality, unconcerned with human affairs, Scripture reveals to us a God who is caring and close to each of his creatures in a very personal way.

There was once a wise and beloved king who cared greatly for his people and wanted the best for them. He took personal interest in their affairs and tried to understand how his decisions affect their lives. Sometimes, he would disguise wandering around the street, trying to see life from their perspective. One day, he disguise himself as the poor villager and went to visit the public bath. People were enjoying the fellowship and relaxation. The water was heated by a furnace in a cellar, where one man was responsible for maintaining the comfort level of the water. The king made his way to the basement to visit with the man who tirelessly tended the fire.

The two men shared meal together as the king tried to befriend the man. Frequently, the king visited this man. He showed care for him which no one has ever done before.

One day the king revealed his identity to his friend. It was a risky move because the man might ask him favor or gift. Instead he looked at the king’s eyes and said, “You left your comfortable palace to sit with me in this hot and dingy cellar. You ate meager food and genuinely showed you cared about what happens to me. On the other people who might bestowed gifts, but to me you gave given the greatest gift of all. You gave me the gift of yourself.

God has given us the greatest gift, Jesus. The devotion to the Sacred Heart is giving importance to the humanity of Jesus who showed God’s love for us in a sublime way by being with us – Emmanuel and He showed how great His love by dying on the cross.  

As we reflect today let us ask ourselves, how do we respond to God’s love.

 

FR. CLOD BAGABALDO

 

10th Sunday

Restored to Life

 

Readings:

1 Kings 17:17-24

Psalms 30: 2,4-6,11-13

Gal 1:11-19

Luke 7:11-17

 

 

Jesus in today’s Gospel meets a funeral procession coming out of the gates of the town of Nain.  Unlike when he raised Jairus’ daughter (Mark 5) or Lazarus (John 11), no one requests his assistance.  Moved by compassion for the widow who had lost her only son, Jesus steps forward and, laying his hand on the bier, commands him to arise.

 

The onlookers were reminded of the story of Elijah in the first reading who raised the dead child of the widow of Zarephath and “gave him [back] to his mother.”  They proclaimed that “a great prophet has arisen in our midst.”

 

Jesus of course is more than a prophet; he is the ruler over life and death.  In the Mosaic law, contact with a dead body renders an Israelite unclean for a week (Numbers 19:11-19).  Jesus’ touch and word reverses that; instead of being defiled by contact with death, he gave life.

 

Like the physical healings that he performed, Jesus’ raising people from the dead is a sign of the Messiah’s arrival (Luke 7:22).  But it is more than that; these healings are visible signs of the awakening and liberating of men from the spiritual death caused by sin (see Mark 2:1-12).

 

The Church Fathers return to this theme again and again.  St. Ambrose writes, “the widow signifies Mother Church, weeping for those who are dead in sin and carried beyond the safety of her gates.  The multitudes looking on will praise the Lord when sinners rise again from death and are restored to their mother.”

 

When we are dead in sin, it is the outstretched hand and the words of Christ spoken by his priest, that raise us from spiritual death and restore us to the arms of our mother, the Church.  With the Psalmist, then, we can sing “I will praise you, Lord, for you have rescued me.  You brought me up from the nether world; you preserved me from those going down into the pit.

 

 

Yours in Christ,

 

Scott Hahn, Ph.D.

CORPUS CHRISTI 2013

Blessed and Given

Readings:

Genesis 14:18-20

Psalm 110:1-4

1 Corinthians 11:23-26

Luke 9:11-17

 

 

At the dawn of salvation history, God revealed our future in figures. That’s what’s going on in today’s First Reading: A king and high priest comes from Jerusalem (see Psalm 76:3), offering bread and wine to celebrate the victory of God’s beloved servant, Abram, over his foes.

 

By his offering, Melchizedek bestows God’s blessings on Abram. He is showing us, too, how one day we will receive God’s blessings and in turn “bless God” - how we will give thanks to Him for delivering us from our enemies, sin and death.

 

As Paul recalls in today’s Epistle, Jesus transformed the sign of bread and wine, making it a sign of His body and blood, through which God bestows upon us the blessings of His “new covenant.”

 

Jesus is “the priest forever according to the order of Melchizedek,” that God, in today’s Psalm, swears will rule from Zion, the new Jerusalem (see Hebrews 6:20-7:3).

 

By the miracle of loaves and fishes, Jesus in today’s Gospel, again prefigures the blessings of the Eucharist.

 

Notice that He takes the bread, blesses it, breaks it, and gives it to the Twelve. You find the precise order and words in the Last Supper (see Luke 22:19) and in His celebration of the Eucharist on the first Easter night (see Luke 24:30).

 

The Eucharist fulfills the offering of Melchizedek. It is the daily miracle of the heavenly high priesthood of Jesus

 

It is a priesthood He conferred upon the Apostles in ordering them to feed the crowd, in filling exactly twelve baskets with leftover bread - in commanding them on the night He was handed over: “Do this in remembrance of Me.”

 

Through His priests He still feeds us in “the deserted place” of our earthly exile.

And by this sign He pledges to us a glory yet to come. For as often as we share in His body and blood. we proclaim His victory over death, until He comes again to make His victory our own.

 

Yours in Christ,

Scott Hahn, Ph.D.

More Articles...

IMNO NI STO. TOMAS

:

Announcements

FOR REFLECTIONS AND PRAYER,

YOU ARE WELCOME TO VISIT

FR. RAMIL’S BLOG  AT

                                   www.ourparishpriest.

                                       blogspot.com

 

FIRST FRIDAY HOLY HOUR AT DEVOTION

 

SA APRIL 4, 2014 AY FIRST FRIDAY. 

 

DUMALO TAYO SA MISA,

 

HOLY HOUR AT PARISH RECOLLECTION

SIMULA 6 PM,

 

KUNG SAAN MARIRINIG NATIN ANG MENSAHE

 

NG SACRED HEART PARA SA ATIN SA BUWANG ITO.

 

MAYROON DING PAGPAPAHID NG LANGIS SA

 

KARANGALAN NI STO TOMAS.

 

MAGKITA-KITA PO TAYO!

 

 

PAANYAYA PARA SA MGA KABATAAN

kabataan,

MAGING malapit sa diyos at DAGDAGAN ANG KAIBIGAN AT BARKADA! 

dumalo sa parish youth ministry,

ang kilusan ng mga kabataan ng ating parokya. 

magkita-kita tayo sa parish hall tuwing sabado

simula alas-7 ng gabi

para sa kwentuhan, pagdarasal,

pakikipag-kaibigan sa diyos at sa isat-isa. 

ISAMA ANG LAHAT NG mga TROPA!

 IBA ANG SAYA KASAMA SI KRISTO!!! 

PAANYAYA PARA SA LOVE OFFERING SA PANGINOON

ANG MGA LOVE-OFFERING ENVELOPES NA IPINAMIMIGAY SA ATIN SA HARAP O PINTO NG SIMBAHAN AY MALAKING TULONG NINYO PARA SA MGA GAWAIN NG ATING SIMBAHAN.  UGALIIN NATIN NA SUPORTAHAN AT TULUNGAN ANG ATING PAROKYA.  BAGAMAT ITO AY HINDI SAPILITAN, SANA’Y MAUNAWAAN NATIN NA ANG ATING SIMBAHAN AY PANANAGUTAN NATIN NA ITAGUYOD SA KANYANG MGA PROYEKTO, MAINTENANCE AT MGA PLANO PARA SA IKADARAKILA NG DIYOS.  MAAARING IBALIK SA OPISINA O KAYA’Y IALAY SA OFFERTORY PROCESSION NG MISA ANG ATING MGA LOVE OFFERING.    ANG BUKAS-PALAD SA DIYOS AY PINAGPAPALA NIYANG LUBOS.  SALAMAT PO.

SCHEDULE OF LITURGICAL SERVICES
HOLY MASS:

SUNDAYS        6:00 AM         

8:00 AM         10:00 AM
4:00 PM           5:00 PM

6:30 PM

MONDAYS    6:00 PM

TUESDAYS
    6:00 PM

WEDNESDAYS
   6:00 AM and 6:00PM

followed by Perpetual Help Novena

THURSDAYS
    6:00 PM

FRIDAYS          6:00 PM

followed by Sto. Tomas Devotion

1st FRIDAYS     6:00 PM

followed by Holy Hour and Parish Recollection                      

SATURDAYS    6:00 AM and
5:30 PM ANTICIPATED MASS

PANALANGIN NG PAROKYA NI STO. TOMAS DE VILLANUEVA

 

AMANG MAPAGMAHAL

TUNGHAYAN MO PO AT KAAWAAN

ANG IYONG MGA ANAK

SA DELA PAZ AT SANTOLAN

NA BUMUBUO SA PAROKYA

NI STO TOMAS DE VILLANUEVA.

NAWAY MAG-UMAPAW

ANG PAGKAKAISA, PAGMAMAHAL

AT PAGLILINGKOD SA AMING LAHAT

KAUGNAY NG AMING OBISPO, KURA PAROKO

AT MGA PARING LINGKOD.

MARANASAN NAWA NG BAWAT

PAMILYA AT PAMAYANAN

ANG IYONG PAGGABAY AT

PAGPAPALANG MATERYAL AT ESPIRITWAL.

ITAGUYOD NAWA NAMIN

ANG MISYON NG SIMBAHAN

NA MAY MALASAKIT SA AMING KAPWA

AT TUNAY NA PAGBIBIGAYAN.

SALAMAT PO SA PAROKYA

NAMING ITO NA SIYANG

TAHANAN NG AMING PUSO

AT BUONG PAGKATAO.

SA PAMAMAGITAN NI KRISTO

KASAMA NG ESPIRITU SANTO

MAGPASAWALANG HANGGAN.  AMEN.

STO. TOMAS DE VILLANUEVA,

IPANALANGIN MO KAMI.  

Facebook Share

Share on facebook

Facebook Page

Who's Online

We have 11 guests online