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21st Sunday C

Gateway to Life

 

Readings:
Isaiah 66:18-21
Psalm 117:1, 2
Hebrews 12:5-7, 11-13
Luke 13:22-30

Jesus doesn’t answer the question put to Him in this Sunday’s Gospel. It profits us nothing to speculate on how many will be saved. What we need to know is what He tells us today - how to enter into salvation and how urgent it is to strive now, before the Master closes the door.

Jesus is “the narrow gate,” the only way of salvation, the path by which all must travel to enter the kingdom of the Father (see John 14:6).

In Jesus, God has come - as He promises in this week’s First Reading - to gather nations of every language, to reveal to them His glory.

Eating and drinking with them, teaching in their streets, Jesus in the Gospel is slowly making His way to Jerusalem. There, Isaiah’s vision will be fulfilled: On the holy mountain He will be lifted up (see John 3:14), will draw to Himself bretheren from among all the nations - to worship in the heavenly Jerusalem, to glorify Him for His kindness, as we sing in Sunday’s Psalm.

In God’s plan, the kingdom was proclaimed first to the Israelites and last to the Gentiles (see Romans 1:16; Acts 3:25-26), who in the Church have come from the earth’s four corners to make up the new people of God (see Isaiah 43:5-6; Psalm 107:2-3).

Many however will lose their place at the heavenly table, Jesus warns. Refusing to accept His narrow way they will weaken, render themselves unknown to the Father (see Isaiah 63:15-16).

We don’t want to be numbered among those of drooping hands and weak knees (see Isaiah 35:3). So we must strive for that narrow gate, a way of hardship and suffering - the way of the beloved Son.

As this week’s Epistle reminds us, by our trials we know we are truly God’s sons and daughters. We are being disciplined by our afflictions, strengthened to walk that straight and narrow path - that we may enter the gate, take our place at the banquet of the righteous.

 

 Yours in Christ,

 


Scott Hahn, Ph.D.

sa gitna ng bagyo

Dear parishioners,

 

Hindi ko kayo marating nang personal sa gitna ng malakas at walang tigil na ulan pero gusto ko malaman ninyo na laman kayo na aking mga panalangin.

 

Alam ko sa tulong ni Sto Tomas de Villanueva, iingatan kayo ng Panginoong Hesus.

 

Ingatan din po ninyo ang inyong kalusugan at kaligtasan sa gitna ng malakas na bagyong ito. Matatapos din ito. May awa ang Diyos!

 

God bless you!

 

Ang inyong Kura Paroko,

 

Fr. Ramil,

Parish Priest

20th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Consuming Fire

18
Hebrews 12:1–4
Luke 12:49–53

 

Our God is a consuming fire, the Scriptures tell us (see Hebrews 12:29; Deuteronomy 4:24).

And in this week’s Gospel, Jesus uses the image of fire to describe the demands of discipleship.

The fire he has come to cast on the earth is the fire that he wants to blaze in each of our hearts. He made us from the dust of the earth (see Genesis 2:7), and filled us with the fire of the Holy Spirit in baptism (see Luke 3:16).

We were baptized into his death (see Romans 6:3). This is the baptism our Lord speaks of in the Gospel this week. The baptism with which He must be baptized is His passion and death, by which He accomplished our redemption and sent forth the fire of the Spirit on the earth (see Acts 2:3).

The fire has been set, but it is not yet blazing. We are called to enter deeper into the consuming love of God. We must examine our consciences and our actions, submitting ourselves to the revaling fire of God’s Word (see 1 Corinthians 3:13).

In our struggle against sin, we have not yet resisted to the point of shedding our own blood, Paul tells us in this week’s Epistle. We have not undergone the suffering that Jeremiah suffers in the First Reading this week. 

But this is what true discipleship requires. To be a disciple is to be inflamed with the love of the God. It is to have an unquenchable desire for holiness and zeal for the salvation of our brothers and sisters.

Being His disciple does not bring peace in the false way that the world proclaims peace (see Jeremiah 8:11). It means division and hardship. It may bring us to conflict with our own flesh and blood.

But Christ is our peace (see Ephesians 2:14). By his cross, he has lifted us up from the mire of sin and death—as he will rescue the prophet Jeremiah (see Jeremiah 38:10).

And as we sing in the Psalm this week, we trust in our deliverer.

 

Yours in Christ,

 

Scott Hahn, Ph.D.

PAGDALAW NG TATLONG IMAHEN NI SANTO TOMAS DE VILLANUEVA MULA SA BULACAN

PROGRAMA

 

August  10,  2013      SABADO

 

1:00pm:  Motorcade  mula  sa  kanto  ng  Marcos  Highway  patungo  sa  Simbahan.     

 

1:50pm:  Panalangin  ng  Pagtanggap  at  Pagpapakilala  sa  mga  imehen.     

 

5:30pm:  Banal  na  Misa  ng  Pagsalubong  sa  tatlong  imahen  mula  sa  Bulacan.     

 

August  16,  2013      BIYERNES

 

8:00am:  Holy  Mass  sponsored  by  STVPS.  Farewell  mass  to  the  image  of  STV.     

 

9:00am:  Pagbabalik  ng  mga  imahen  sa  Bulacan.    

18th Sunday C


Lk.12: 13-21

Look Beyond Ourselves, Look Beyond this World

“Take care to guard against all greed for though one may be rich, one’s life does not consist of possessions” (Lk.12: 15).

 

A man asked God, “What is a million years like to you?” God responded, “Like one second.” Again the man asked, “What is a million dollars like to you?” And God replied, “Like a penny.” The man begged, “Can I have a penny?” God said, “Just a second.”

We value our time and treasure, but it seems these do not matter to God. While there is nothing wrong in using our time to work hard and acquire some wealth to live a more convenient life, let us not however, forget that we work in order to live and not live in order to work. There are two Filipino words for work, trabaho (job) and hanap-buhay, which literally translated means looking for ways to sustain one’s life. I believe the latter captures the essence of why we work - to sustain our life. But when we desire to become rich that our works become our life then we have a problem. 

Jesus told a parable about a rich man whose land produced a bountiful harvest. He did not have enough space to store them. He torn down his barns and built larger ones. Then he said to himself, “Now as for you, you have many good things stored up for many years rest, eat, drink, and be merry!” But God said to him, “You fool, this night your life will be demanded for you; and the things you have prepared, to whom will they belong?” (lk.12:16-20). In this parable Jesus is teaching us what our attitude towards material things should be. The sin of the man is not actually in being rich but in not figuring out a more generous way to handle his riches. There are two things that stand out about this man. First, he never saw beyond himself. In spite of his abundance, it never got into his head to give some away, but his attitude was always how to get more. Second, he never saw beyond this world. All his plans were made on the basis of life here.

If we do not notice how our values and priorities become disproportionate, that as our insecurities in life increase, our propensity to be happy decreases; if we become discontent with what we have; obsessed in swelling our bank accounts, crave for a more affluent life, and aspire for higher positions; if most of our time is spent in pursuit of our desire to be rich; if we start to forget the people around us and we can no longer appreciate the simple joys of life, our greed makes us blind that we cannot see beyond ourselves.

If we cannot remember that there is life after this life. If our focus is only in this world that we lose sight of heaven, if we become rich with material wealth but impoverished with spiritual treasures, our greed makes us blind that we cannot see beyond our world.

        

Jesus tells us that there is no security in material riches. In the Gospel, true riches is consist of not how much we possess, but how much we are willing to give for the love of God in the service of our neighbor. The late Archbishop Fulton Sheen said, “The measure of our generosity is not how much we give but how much is left to us” William Barclay told a story about John Wesley’s rule of life which was to save all he could and give all he could. When he was at Oxford he has an income of £30 a year. He lived on £28 and gave £2 away. When his income increased to £60, £90, and £120 a year, he still lived on £28 and gave the balance away. The Accountant–General for Household Plate demanded a return from him. His reply was “I have two silver tea spoons at London and two at Bristol. This is all the plate which I have at present; and I shall not buy anymore, while so many around me want bread.”

 

Let us learn to look beyond ourselves. Even in own poverty, we still have something to share. Let us learn to look beyond this world. Life does not end here. Let us not forget heaven.

 

 

Rev. Fr. Clod V. Bagabaldo

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IMNO NI STO. TOMAS

STO. TOMAS ON HELPING THE NEEDY: If there are people who refuse to work, that is for the authorities to deal with. My duty is to assist and relieve those who come to my door.

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para sa kwentuhan, pagdarasal,

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SCHEDULE OF LITURGICAL SERVICES
HOLY MASS:

SUNDAYS        6:00 AM         

8:00 AM         10:00 AM
4:00 PM           5:00 PM

6:30 PM

MONDAYS    6:00 PM

TUESDAYS
    6:00 PM

WEDNESDAYS
   6:00 AM and 6:00PM

followed by Perpetual Help Novena

THURSDAYS
    6:00 PM

FRIDAYS          6:00 PM

followed by Sto. Tomas Devotion

1st FRIDAYS     6:00 PM

followed by Holy Hour and Parish Recollection                      

SATURDAYS    6:00 AM and
5:30 PM ANTICIPATED MASS

PANALANGIN NG PAROKYA NI STO. TOMAS DE VILLANUEVA

 

AMANG MAPAGMAHAL

TUNGHAYAN MO PO AT KAAWAAN

ANG IYONG MGA ANAK

SA DELA PAZ AT SANTOLAN

NA BUMUBUO SA PAROKYA

NI STO TOMAS DE VILLANUEVA.

NAWAY MAG-UMAPAW

ANG PAGKAKAISA, PAGMAMAHAL

AT PAGLILINGKOD SA AMING LAHAT

KAUGNAY NG AMING OBISPO, KURA PAROKO

AT MGA PARING LINGKOD.

MARANASAN NAWA NG BAWAT

PAMILYA AT PAMAYANAN

ANG IYONG PAGGABAY AT

PAGPAPALANG MATERYAL AT ESPIRITWAL.

ITAGUYOD NAWA NAMIN

ANG MISYON NG SIMBAHAN

NA MAY MALASAKIT SA AMING KAPWA

AT TUNAY NA PAGBIBIGAYAN.

SALAMAT PO SA PAROKYA

NAMING ITO NA SIYANG

TAHANAN NG AMING PUSO

AT BUONG PAGKATAO.

SA PAMAMAGITAN NI KRISTO

KASAMA NG ESPIRITU SANTO

MAGPASAWALANG HANGGAN.  AMEN.

STO. TOMAS DE VILLANUEVA,

IPANALANGIN MO KAMI.  

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